Pinterest as a Social Justice Tool

pinterest logoYou might be surprised to learn that I’m a Pinterest early adopter and still a fairly frequent user. Pinterest gets a reputation as a place that’s mostly for planning weddings or posting unrealistic food porn, but that’s not the only thing it’s useful for. While I’m also pretty into fannish content and nail art, I primarily use my Pinterest as a social justice curation tool.

The nice thing about Pinterest is that it’s heavily geared towards curation. I find that when you get creative about the theme of a particular board, it can be a really good way to assemble a collection of activist messages, or find inspiration from images of marginalized bodies, or make a statement with a kind of curated art project. For example, one of my favorite boards is Gender Expressions, which is really just a bunch of images of people, but the point is that gender expression is incredibly diverse. On a series of “Education” boards, I’ve tried curating interesting pins on one particular topic, such as this one on Radical History and Geography. And of course, there’s a Radically Queer board that mixes thought-provoking words with simple representation in images.

Even if you’re not explicitly using Pinterest for social justice like this (and I wish more people were!), you can also do some sort of guerilla activism by simply focusing on representation in your boards. For example, I have a couple of dance boards where I try to keep images of thin white women down to less than half of the content. I don’t think this kind of thing is likely to disrupt Pinterest’s core market, but I would love to see more activism happening there–self-care in an age of Trump boards, anyone?

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About Avory

Avory Faucette is a queer feminist activist, writer, and public speaker. Zie graduated from the University of Iowa with a JD in 2009, focusing on international human rights and gender/sexuality issues in the law. Hir current work focuses on queer identity, policy, and marginalized identities under the queer umbrella. As a genderqueer person, zie comments frequently on non-binary identity, transgender and genderqueer issues, and media coverage of these populations. Zie also speaks at colleges, universities, and events on transgender and queer issues and conducts trainings on related topics.

Posted on March 14, 2017, in activism and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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