Framing the Abortion Issue

I touched on this topic in my Blog for Choice post this year, but I wanted to go into it a bit more, because I think issue-framing is something crucial that we sometimes ignore in our debates.  I’ve noticed that pro-choice people often use the argument, to try to look less “scary,” that no one wants abortions, or that both sides want fewer abortions.  Whether it’s true or not, this is a problem.

The problem is that this argument makes the debate about should women have abortions? I don’t think we want to go there.  Once we go there, then the point of contention becomes “how do we reduce abortions?”  And we know we disagree on this.  One side thinks the answer is abstinence-only education, crisis pregnancy centers, and making abortion illegal.  The other side thinks the answer is sex education, combating rape culture, and fighting systemic issues that take away womens’ effective right to choose.  Certainly, that’s a debate we need to be having, but not while the legal right to have an abortion is under attack.

What we should be asking is not should women have abortions, but should abortions be safe and legal? Abortions will happen.  Even if we “want fewer abortions,” we’re never going to get it down to zero.  We need to focus on the medical trauma that women go through when they go to unsafe providers.  We need to focus on how provisions like the Hyde Amendment and any number of state laws make it impossible for poor women, many of whom are indigenous women and women of color, to get a safe and legal abortion.  We need to focus on the costs to the system when women try to abort without proper medical attention, and then come in for emergency care.  We need to put that stark picture in pro lifers’ faces and say “is this what you want?”  Then, we need to address the issues that underlie abortion.  We can do this simultaneously, advocating for sex education, for enterprise programs in poor neighborhoods that give women more options, for an end to racist policies, for anti-rape messages in schools, for all these things that will in the long run decrease the number of abortions.  But we can’t make our argument about whether women should have abortions, or we stand a high chance of losing.

About Avory

Avory Faucette is a queer feminist activist, writer, and public speaker. Zie graduated from the University of Iowa with a JD in 2009, focusing on international human rights and gender/sexuality issues in the law. Hir current work focuses on queer identity, policy, and marginalized identities under the queer umbrella. As a genderqueer person, zie comments frequently on non-binary identity, transgender and genderqueer issues, and media coverage of these populations. Zie also speaks at colleges, universities, and events on transgender and queer issues and conducts trainings on related topics.

Posted on March 19, 2010, in class, reproductive rights and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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