My Final Thoughts on this Election Year

A lot of bloggers have been inspired this election.  You’ve posted your critical thoughts throughout the campaign, and you’ve rallied friends and family to support Mr. Obama with phone calls, canvassing, and rides for elderly or disabled voters.  In the closing moments of the campaign, you’ve been brought to tears of joy and feelings of profound hope.  For me, that wasn’t this campaign.  Some of the things said in the primaries still stick with me.  Mr. Obama’s positions on some of my key issues are not strong enough, or are in actual disagreement with mine.  I don’t necessarily believe that I can trust him to stand up for my rights.  But you know what he has done?  He’s treated women and LGBT people with dignity and respect in this campaign.  That’s a crucial first step.  We didn’t get that from the last president, and we didn’t get that from the Republican candidate.  I may not be convinced that he’ll support my rights when the going gets tough, but he’s not going backward, and that’s absolutely crucial.

Furthermore, I can see that he’s a good man who ran a good campaign, and I can see what he represents for so many of you.  This is not my campaign, but it is yours.  Those of you who blogged about how Mr. Obama inspired your children nearly did bring tears to my eyes.  For millions of kids out there, this campaign is something much, much bigger.  It reminds them that there is someone – a really big someone – who judges them not by the hyphen in their identity but is proud of them as Americans, period.  I’m glad that your children have that person.  And you know what?  My candidate will come.  One day I’ll have my big moment – maybe I’ll be that sixty year old woman proudly making calls with my name written in marker on my phone at the campaign office when the first lesbian runs for President.  I’d like to believe that it’s possible.  Of course, I may not be a citizen by then, but you never know.  My point is, I’m delighted that some of you had such a thrilling, inspiring two years.  I was happy to vote for Mr. Obama, and I will be happy to call him my President.  He’s a good guy, and this will be a good four years.

About Avory

Avory Faucette is a queer feminist activist, writer, and public speaker. Zie graduated from the University of Iowa with a JD in 2009, focusing on international human rights and gender/sexuality issues in the law. Hir current work focuses on queer identity, policy, and marginalized identities under the queer umbrella. As a genderqueer person, zie comments frequently on non-binary identity, transgender and genderqueer issues, and media coverage of these populations. Zie also speaks at colleges, universities, and events on transgender and queer issues and conducts trainings on related topics.

Posted on November 4, 2008, in law & politics, Uncategorized and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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